Community Shows Broad Support for “The Way Forward”

Last week MFAN launched a new policy paper, The Way Forward: A Reform Agenda for 2014 and Beyond, and with it, a newly streamlined agenda focused on two key pillars of reform: accountability through transparency, evaluation and learning; and country ownership of the priorities and resources for, and implementation of, development.

Take a look at what the community is saying about the new paper…

Plan International USA
: The fact is there is mounting evidence that aid, designed and delivered around these pillars, is more likely to have higher impact and deliver sustainable benefits well beyond the original time frame of the donor-funded project.

Oxfam America: The Modernizing Foreign Assistance Network’s new agenda focuses the tools that partner country stakeholders need to make smart decisions about their own development.

U.S. Global Leadership Coalition: Much has changed in the world since 2009, and these two issues offer a smart focus on where progress could be made. They reinforce the recognition that private sources of capital (investments, remittances, private philanthropy) into the developing world have grown over the last forty years to dwarf official assistance, which now must leverage rather than substitute for private capital.

ONE: These reforms will ensure that US development will be more effective and more efficient, ensuring that the money we spend to fight global poverty is making developing countries’ systems more sustainable, and governments, both here and abroad, more accountable.

Save the Children: U.S. foreign aid to developing countries is vital in the effort to save lives, fight famine, put kids in schools, and respond to disasters. But, our help will be even more impactful and lasting if designed and implemented in true partnership with developing country governments and citizens, in ways that strengthen their own efforts, and that they can build on.

The Hewlett Foundation: If the world’s biggest bilateral donor puts partner country priorities at the top of the agenda, invites their citizens to the table, and opens its books about how much it spends and what it does (or doesn’t) achieve, this sets a standard by which other actors, including partner countries themselves and private investors, are held to account.

The Lugar Center: These two priorities will form the core of MFAN’s work over the next two years. During this period – as our country enters the next presidential election cycle — it is critical that we solidify progress that has been made on foreign assistance reform and build a consensus for a deeper reform agenda.

Bread for the World Institute: MFAN emphasizes that development and development co-operation need to promote inclusive, accountable partnerships that support country-led processes that will improve the lives of hungry and poor people.

Devex: The next two years are an important window of opportunity for U.S. aid reform. The midterm elections in 2014 are certain to shake up the membership of Congress. In 2015, the Millennium Development Goals will expire and a new global development agenda will take its place. And 2016 will bring with it the end of the Obama administration.

Inter Press Service: U.S. foreign aid is becoming increasingly outdated, analysts here are suggesting.
Rather, reforms to U.S. assistance need to focus on issues of accountability and country ownership, according to a policy paper released this week by Modernizing Foreign Assistance Network (MFAN), a prominent coalition of international development advocates and foreign policy experts.

Politix: While both the Obama administration and the Bush administration before it have taken important steps to push the ball forward, there are still a number of reforms that would make a big difference in getting the best value for our money and helping move more people out of poverty, more reliably. These are outlined in MFAN’s new policy paper, The Way Forward: A Reform Agenda for 2014 and Beyond, which reflects on past achievements and describes the path ahead.

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